Moments from the History of Rain

rain wasn’t always like it is now:
instead of falling it came from a hidden dimension
bringing wet the soil would welcome, wet we’d try to collect & shape

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once rain swarmed like bees, inundating fields or
selectively touching only blue collars, only animals with stubby tails.
hurricanes and tornadoes were rituals where the queen took over (filled) the sky
with unexplainable presence

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air so rich with oxygen the rain became acidic, turning giant ferns to mush,
eating away dinosaurs skins to polish their bones

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when the moon couldn’t yet pull the oceans but focused the moisture exchange,
creating deficits & surpluses, hoping the right amount in the right place
would distract gravity
                                          wind was meatier then, strumming lunar strings,
drinking lustily yet never letting go, a river spewing its own tail.
when during summer water got so thick & redolent
we cultivated plants that hid the smells, silenced what we couldn’t decide
were myth, history or infomercials

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noah’s rain was 40 days and nights of drop shaped vessels evacuating earth,
darkening the skies with all the buildings and records they destroyed–
what we thought volcanos were camouflaged incinerators

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when I come back rains at its best—unpredictable, generous & nourishing.
we still have roofs and slickers to keep from overdosing;
indoors we’re naked out of reverence, deeply joyed
when our cupped hands fill with rain from elsewhere

 

Dan Raphael

About Dan Raphael

The State I’m In, which came out this March, is a collection of new dan raphael poetry. Current poems appear in Otoliths, Rattapallax. Caliban, Snakeskin and Skidrow Penthouse. He performs throughout the Northwest and recently began teaching a workshop on how to perform your own poetry. dan currently arranges the Market Day reading series in St Johns, and had run a series downtown for 13 years; he published 26 Books—26 books of 26 pages by 26 OR & WA writers--and edited NRG magazine.
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